Your Sunday Will Come

 
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Happy Saturday, friends! This post will be a two-part piece. One part anticipating the hope of Easter and how symbolic it is for those of you in a hard place right now. One part co-parenting reminders if you have the littles.

First, I think a lot of you can relate the pain and suffering you’ve experienced to that of what Christ went through for us. With that, it’s the hope of how the redemptive story ends that gives us hope for our own story. In reflecting on Good Friday, I found this gem. Joseph Wirthlin wrote this goodness on the anticipation of Easter and it realllllllly spoke to me. Claim this Easter as YOUR Sunday. The one that will come and bring light to the despair in your life.

“Each of us will have our own Fridays—those days when the universe itself seems shattered and the shards of our world lie littered about us in pieces. We all will experience those broken times when it seems we can never be put together again. We will all have our Fridays. But I testify to you in the name of the One who conquered death—Sunday will come. In the darkness of our sorrow, Sunday will come. No matter our desperation, no matter our grief, Sunday will come. In this life or the next, Sunday will come.”

YOUR Sunday will come. The day that you wake up and life is bright and hopeful. The day where there are more happy moments than sad ones. The day when you feel whole again. That's your Sunday, and it will come.

Now, read on if you have the little ones ... here are some reminders on how to interact with those you co-parent with. It’s Easter, after all! We must love all of the sinners Christ died for (even your ex ...ugh).

Swallow Your Pride. Prepare your heart in prayer for the interactions you’ll have. Pray for your parenting example to be one of unconditional love, forgiveness, self-respect, humility, and kindness regardless of the circumstances.

Focus On Your Child. There’s nothing more magical than children during holidays. Nothing should squash that excitement. Let their pure bliss take over your situation. Encourage the joy and stay in that place with them. Your child will always be the brightest of all silver-lining in the heartache you’ve experienced.

Check the Trash Talk. Venting is important, but not meant for holiday gatherings. It is meant for the ears of close friends where children are not present. Remember your child knows that he/she is made up of both parents. If you are talking negatively about half of them, they will start doubting their worth and self-esteem. Give your child the gift of holding your tongue.

I am praying you can get through these interactions like a champ and that you’ll keep your focus on what the hope of Easter means for YOU and YOUR Sunday.